The Female Voice in the Twentieth Century : Material, Symbolic and Aesthetic Dimensions /

Publication Type:

Book

Source:

p.1 online resource (219 p.). (2021)

ISBN:

9781000352658

Call Number:

ML82

URL:

http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&scope=site&db=nlebk&db=nlabk&AN=2633241

Mots-clés:

Feminism and music., Singing., Voice., Women musicians.

Notes:

Description based upon print version of record.Cover -- Half Title -- Series Page -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Table of Contents -- List of figures -- List of tables -- List of musical examples -- List of contributors -- Preface -- Part 1 The 'voice' and the voices: definitions, iconologies, myths and practices -- Chapter 1 Vocalising honey -- Chapter 2 Writing the female voice from Debussy to Boulez -- Chapter 3 Eurydice's voice in contemporary opera -- Chapter 4 Maria Callas and the achievement of an operatic vocal subjectivity -- Chapter 5 How female is the voice? Conceptualisations and practicesPart 2 The grain of the voices, experimentation and technology -- Chapter 6 Love, race and resistance: the fugitive voice of Nina Simone -- Chapter 7 Black sonic refusal -- Chapter 8 The voice that gives voice: female folk revival singers around 1968 -- Chapter 9 Women's voices in Cairo, Egypt, at the turn of the twentieth century -- Chapter 10 'Hear what I Feel': Joan La Barbara, the 1970s and the 'extended voice' -- Chapter 11 Remediating the female voice in extremis(m): The Human Voice (1966) -- IndexBy integrating theoretical approaches to the female voice with the musicological investigation of female singers' practices, the contributors to this volume offer fresh viewpoints on the material, symbolic and cultural aspects of the female voice in the twentieth century. Various styles and genres are covered, including Western art music, experimental composition, popular music, urban folk and jazz. The volume offers a substantial and innovative appraisal of the role of the female voice from the perspective of twentieth-century performance practices, the centrality of female singers' experimentations and extended vocal techniques along with the process of the 'subjectivisation' of the voice.